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From Todd Kirkland, Getty Images

Jazz Chisholm Can’t Get Much Better

What a first couple weeks for Jazz Chisholm. The 23-year-old Bahamian second baseman has hit like a 10-year vet, bashing balls in the strike zone and laying off pitches out of it. His .324/.458/.703 slash line looks like prime Barry Bonds, as does his 214 OPS+. He’s also gone three for three on the base paths for good measure. We were told this kid’s tools could make him an immediate contributor. So far, he’s been grossly undersold.

A Complete Package

He hasn’t just put up numbers like Barry Bonds, he kinda looks like him in the box too. Seriously. They have similar swings, stances, and loads, and both were blessed with ungodly athleticism and bat speed. Seeing Jazz turn on a two-strike 100 MPH fastball up in the zone from Jacob deGrom and send it into the upper deck at Citi Field was positively Bonds-like. Not a bad person to resemble.

I am NOT saying the Marlins have the next Barry Bonds on their hands, ’cause we all know that’s a once-in-a-lifetime type of player. But Jazz’s mechanics resemble that of the seven-time MVP, which bodes well for his future prospects.

Jazz hasn’t been elite on D in the very young season, but that comes with a caveat; he’s not really a second baseman. His true position is shortstop, where he’ll probably be playing full-time in a year or two. I would not be surprised if he becomes an above average second baseman before the season is up, but even if he doesn’t, I’m not judging him on defense until I see him at short.

Did I say he could run? Because this guy can scoot. His sprint speed is terrific, as is his efficiency on the bases thus far. Jazz Chisholm could be an annual 30-30 threat, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he got to 20-20 this season. This kid has the potential to be a special, special player.

Remember the Tale of Icarus

.324/.458/.703 is the best anyone can expect from Jazz Chisholm. That’s more than you can expect from him. That’s more than you can expect from anyone. And yet, somehow, Jazz has done more than just tear the cover off the ball. His personality has been just as electric.

This is what worries me juuuuust a little. I don’t want Jazz becoming a target of enemy pitchers looking to silence the cocky young star, moreso than his elite play already will. But saying things like Jacob deGrom’s 100 MPH fastball is “light” or that he wanted to take Zac Gallen (the player he was traded for) deep when he faced him tends to put a target on your back, fair or not. He has 33 big league games under his belt. I don’t want him flying too close to the sun this early. The big personality is good for the game and good for his personal brand, but I hope he can take the added attention it creates.

I think he can. He appears to be that good. That I’m-gonna-dominate-and-have-fun-doing-it-and-there’s-nothing-you-can-do-to-stop-me level of good. But like I said, it makes me nervous.

Regardless, the Jazz Age in Miami has been nothing short of mesmerizing so far.