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Chicago Blackhawks Hire Their First Female Player Development Coach

One of the toughest industries to break into for women is the sports industry. This includes being sports writers and broadcasters and being part of professional organizations in their front offices. While the 21st century has proved to be the most productive for women, there is still a long way to go to achieve equality. The Chicago Blackhawks have pushed that process forward in their industry, however.

Kendall Coyne

Associated Press via Canadian Press

An excellent way to march towards that goal is by hiring women in positions of power and leadership in sports. The NHL has taken a stride in the right direction. The Chicago Blackhawks have made franchise history by hiring their first-ever female player development coach: Kendall Coyne. She will develop players at the professional level, while also helping with youth hockey growth.

Coyne, who spent her college years playing hockey for Division 1 Northeastern University in Boston, earned many awards during her distinguished career. She received the Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award as the top player in women’s college hockey during the 2015-16 season. She then moved on to an international career with Team USA. During that time, she won six world championships and two Olympic medals, including winning gold in 2018.

Outside of her days as a hockey forward, Kendall Coyne has also involved herself in the game in other ways. Most notably, she took part in NBC Sports’ first ever all-female broadcast crew for the Blackhawks’ home game on March 8th against the St. Louis Blues.

A Step in the Right Direction

This addition is important to women everywhere, especially those looking to break into the sports industry. The Blackhawks’ organization and the NHL have made a vital step in incorporating women and promoting equality. Congrats to Kendall Coyne on this incredibly powerful accomplishment, one that will hopefully lead to more female representation across the NHL, and sports in general.